Dikala Bulan Bermain Biola

invisiblestories:

Drawing by Josephine Demme
Fiction Seminar
Ben Marcus
Technologies of Heartbreak 
This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 
2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates
2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell
2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe
3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson
3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 
4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy
4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing
4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles
4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles
5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard
See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.
(viabelievermag)

invisiblestories:

Drawing by Josephine Demme

Fiction Seminar

Ben Marcus

Technologies of Heartbreak 

This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 

2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates

2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell

2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor

2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe

3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates

3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson

3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald

3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 

4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy

4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing

4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles

5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard

See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

(viabelievermag)

“I knew that if I tried to write a novel in chronological order, I was going to get bogged down in the litany of ‘then this happened, then this happened, then this happened.’ I think that’s my failing. As a writer I have difficulty sustaining interest in plot when it unfolds in so linear a way. So I made a very conscious decision, saying to myself, “Why don’t I give it away? And then I’m not stuck with the burden of the chronology.” I also had a feeling—and this developed later—that I wasn’t going to be able to pull off a surprise ending. So again, I thought removing any attempt at that would help me.”

—   Robin Black (via mttbll)

(Source: fictionwritersreview.com, via mttbll)

oldbookillustrations:

Imambara, Lucknow.
Hercule (?) Catenacci, from India, pictorial and descriptive, by William Henry Davenport Adams, London, New York, 1888.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Imambara, Lucknow.

Hercule (?) Catenacci, from India, pictorial and descriptive, by William Henry Davenport Adams, London, New York, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

theparisreview:

“Football games between sides with history between them seem to exist in a multiverse—everything that has happened between them happens here simultaneously. All outcomes exist at once.”
Rowan Ricardo Phillips on yesterday’s metaphysical World Cup semifinal match between Argentina and the Netherlands.

theparisreview:

“Football games between sides with history between them seem to exist in a multiverse—everything that has happened between them happens here simultaneously. All outcomes exist at once.”

Rowan Ricardo Phillips on yesterday’s metaphysical World Cup semifinal match between Argentina and the Netherlands.

oldbookillustrations:

I now resolved to travel quite across to the seashore.

T. H. Nicholson, from The adventures of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe, London, 1862.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

I now resolved to travel quite across to the seashore.

T. H. Nicholson, from The adventures of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe, London, 1862.

(Source: archive.org)

What Would Twitter Do?

believermag:

image

In the fifth instalment of What Would Twitter Do? I speak to Tao Lin (@tao_lin) about how he uses Twitter and his Twitter philosophy. He is the author of several books, including (most recently) Taipei, as well as Shoplifting from American Apparel and Richard Yates and more. He writes fiction, poetry and essays, and draws pictures and runs the publishing house/website Muumuu House and the film company MDMAfilms. He is one of the most generous popularizers of other writers and artists among working authors today. I think he is also one of the first people I followed on Twitter.

With Tao Lin, the persona and the person seem to have no fault lines—whether in his poetry, in comments sections on articles about him, in emails or on Twitter, his tone is consistent, original, interesting, and always accompanied by his avatar, that Daiquiri Ice blue square. Some people have identified a numbness in his voice, but to me it is more like the radical acceptance of someone encountering the world without judgement or inclination. Some sample recent tweets: “Imagining oneself meditating as a method for meditating” and “Cleaning my floor w watermelon.”

I sent him the following questions by email. He answered within a few days.

- Sheila Heti

SHEILA HETI: How do you imagine people read twitter?

TAO LIN: On their phones I think mostly. I think I’ve read the most Twitter while laying in bed or on my back, or just laying in places, like in parks or in airports. Maybe not the most, but a lot. I’ve dropped my phone on my face many times. I think other people must too, but I rarely hear about this.

SH: When you imagine your tweets going into the reader’s head, do you think of them as isolated things, or do you visualize them in a stream with other tweets?

TL: I usually envision them as isolated things. I haven’t thought about this before I think. That’s interesting, because maybe I should be visualizing them in a stream with other people’s tweets, if I want to have an idea of what people are seeing actually. Maybe that’s too complicated though.

SH: Do you save tweets in a drafts folder, or just write them and tweet?

TL: I used to have a drafts folder, which was a Gmail email draft that I would just click on when I wanted to add something and save when I was done adding something, but at some point I cleared out my entire 100+ drafts of various things. Then I think my Twitter drafts moved to a Google Drive file for a while. I would put all my drafts of tweets there. How a draft of a tweet gets made is that I’m trying to type the tweet and I either give up, or don’t like what I’ve typed, but don’t dislike it enough to delete it, then I put it in the drafts area. I haven’t that done in maybe 2 years, though. At some point I started only mostly tweeting via iPhone, and Twitter on the phone has the “save draft” option. So at any moment I might have 5-30 drafts now. They’re usually just things I try to tweet then stop for some reason before tweeting. Also if I have low self-esteem and am feeling shy or afraid it can get “difficult” for me to tweet. At these times I’ll save the tweet regardless what it is.

SH: How often would you say you delete a tweet after you’ve tweeted it? Which are the ones you tend to delete?

TL: Maybe ~20% (I want to popularize “~”, it means approximately, seems useful) of the time. Maybe more in the past. Every time I read back through my tweets, I’ll delete some of them, sometimes almost impulsively, just not wanting to spread whatever meme the tweet I’ve tweeted represents, so that some other tweet or idea can dominate more, is maybe what I intuitively feel when I do that. I don’t have a consistent system for this yet, I don’t think I ever will and don’t want one at this point maybe.

Read More

usemelikeacow:

Destruction of Neo-Tokyo, CE 2019

(via biblioklept)

“Thinking is the activity I love best, and writing to me is simply thinking through my fingers. I can write up to 18 hours a day. Typing 90 words a minute, I’ve done better than 50 pages a day. Nothing interferes with my concentration. You could put on an orgy in my office and I wouldn’t look up. Well, maybe once.”

—   Isaac Asimov (via vintageanchorbooks)
"Well, the relationship between writing—and reading—and detective work has been around for a while, since Edgar Allan Poe, at least. Ricardo Piglia, a great Argentine writer and scholar of crime fiction, has written excellent essays about this. The figure of the detective as a type of marginalized intellectual is one of the tropes of crime fiction that most interests me. Another is the tension between rationality and madness; in general, the detective is the lucid one. I wanted my narrator to subvert this a little bit, to suggest a different idea in the story: the link between madness and writing—especially when one is trying to “reflect reality” in a piece of fiction."
Jorge Enrique Large

"Well, the relationship between writing—and reading—and detective work has been around for a while, since Edgar Allan Poe, at least. Ricardo Piglia, a great Argentine writer and scholar of crime fiction, has written excellent essays about this. The figure of the detective as a type of marginalized intellectual is one of the tropes of crime fiction that most interests me. Another is the tension between rationality and madness; in general, the detective is the lucid one. I wanted my narrator to subvert this a little bit, to suggest a different idea in the story: the link between madness and writing—especially when one is trying to “reflect reality” in a piece of fiction."

Jorge Enrique Large