Dikala Bulan Bermain Biola

millionsmillions:

“Read the stories. Read the novels. Just read Hrabal.”

“I would have liked to be a bullfighter, tight-rope walker, carpenter, scientist, mechanic, marble cutter, doctor, boxer, judiciary secretary, gravedigger, auctioneer, pharmacist, plumber, chess player, soccer talent scout, supporting actor in a hundred Hollywood films, dance teacher, psychologist, radiophysicist, sleepwalker, lawyer, spy, airfield fireman. And all this just for starters.”

—   Enrique Vila-Matas
azurea:

Octavio Paz via Guardagujas. S/d del autor.

azurea:

Octavio Paz via Guardagujas. S/d del autor.

(via translatable)

biblioklept:

The Traveller — Jeffrey Smart
biblioklept:

“How I classify” — Georges Perec
From Georges Perec’s “Reading: A Socio-Physiological Outline.” Collected in Species of Spaces and Other Pieces.

biblioklept:

“How I classify” — Georges Perec

From Georges Perec’s “Reading: A Socio-Physiological Outline.” Collected in Species of Spaces and Other Pieces.

invisiblestories:

Drawing by Josephine Demme
Fiction Seminar
Ben Marcus
Technologies of Heartbreak 
This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 
2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates
2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell
2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe
3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson
3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 
4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy
4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing
4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles
4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles
5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard
See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.
(viabelievermag)

invisiblestories:

Drawing by Josephine Demme

Fiction Seminar

Ben Marcus

Technologies of Heartbreak 

This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 

2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates

2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell

2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor

2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe

3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates

3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson

3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald

3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 

4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy

4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing

4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles

5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard

See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

(viabelievermag)

“I knew that if I tried to write a novel in chronological order, I was going to get bogged down in the litany of ‘then this happened, then this happened, then this happened.’ I think that’s my failing. As a writer I have difficulty sustaining interest in plot when it unfolds in so linear a way. So I made a very conscious decision, saying to myself, “Why don’t I give it away? And then I’m not stuck with the burden of the chronology.” I also had a feeling—and this developed later—that I wasn’t going to be able to pull off a surprise ending. So again, I thought removing any attempt at that would help me.”

—   Robin Black (via mttbll)

(Source: fictionwritersreview.com, via mttbll)

oldbookillustrations:

Imambara, Lucknow.
Hercule (?) Catenacci, from India, pictorial and descriptive, by William Henry Davenport Adams, London, New York, 1888.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Imambara, Lucknow.

Hercule (?) Catenacci, from India, pictorial and descriptive, by William Henry Davenport Adams, London, New York, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

theparisreview:

“Football games between sides with history between them seem to exist in a multiverse—everything that has happened between them happens here simultaneously. All outcomes exist at once.”
Rowan Ricardo Phillips on yesterday’s metaphysical World Cup semifinal match between Argentina and the Netherlands.

theparisreview:

“Football games between sides with history between them seem to exist in a multiverse—everything that has happened between them happens here simultaneously. All outcomes exist at once.”

Rowan Ricardo Phillips on yesterday’s metaphysical World Cup semifinal match between Argentina and the Netherlands.

oldbookillustrations:

I now resolved to travel quite across to the seashore.

T. H. Nicholson, from The adventures of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe, London, 1862.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

I now resolved to travel quite across to the seashore.

T. H. Nicholson, from The adventures of Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe, London, 1862.

(Source: archive.org)